Providence Athenaeum Salon: How to Think about War
Nov
22
5:00 PM17:00

Providence Athenaeum Salon: How to Think about War

Why do nations go to war? What are citizens willing to die for? What justifies foreign invasion? And does might always make right? For nearly 2,500 years, students, politicians, political thinkers, and military leaders have read the eloquent and shrewd speeches in Thucydides’ History of the Peloponnesian War for profound insights into military conflict, diplomacy, and the behavior of people and countries in times of crisis. Scholar Johanna Hanink discusses her new book How to Think about War: An Ancient Guide to Foreign Policy, which offers new translations of the artful Athenian speeches from History, a work that the ancient historian hoped would become a “possession for all time.” Book signing to follow.

Register here: https://provath_thucydides112219.eventbrite.com/

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FIEC public event: Classics in the 21st century
Jul
4
5:30 PM17:30

FIEC public event: Classics in the 21st century

We live in a world where the lessons of the past are constantly ignored or dismissed. Yet the past continues to fascinate us. The classical world especially has never been more popular. In movies, novels, video games and TV documentaries, Greece and Rome are constantly in the public eye. So what does the classical world have to offer us in the 21st century? In this session, a panel of classical scholars with a special interest in contemporary popular culture will debate this issue, with questions and contributions from members of the audience.

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Classical Debt One Year On: Antiquity, Greek Crises, and the View from 2018
May
19
2:00 PM14:00

Classical Debt One Year On: Antiquity, Greek Crises, and the View from 2018

Ever since 2010, the country of Greece has been notorious for its monetary debt. But for two centuries, the phrase “Greek debt” has also meant something quite different: the symbolic debt that Western civilization owes to Greece for furnishing its principles of democracy, philosophy, mathematics, and fine art. This lecture will depart from the premise that there are two sides to Greek debt: the premise that is the foundation of Johanna Hanink’s 2017 book The Classical Debt: Greek Antiquity in an Era of Austerity (Harvard University Press). Hanink will also respond to various critiques of the book, and consider just what has changed—and what, sadly, has not—about the accounting (and accounts) of that debt since the book manuscript was put to bed, just weeks after the “Brexit” referendum in June of 2016.

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